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election2001
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Readers Poll Con 52% Lab 28% LD 18% Nat 2% Enter your vote to win 1M

Sedgefield
Labour hold

Constituency Profile by Robert Waller
As Tony Blair looks like a hot favourite to become the first ever Labour Prime Minister to win two full terms of office, he is a racing certainty to win his fifth term as MP for Sedgefield. He could not be blamed if his mind wandered frequently onto the larger stage which he bestrides. He maintains a residence, Myrobella, in the community of Trimdon colliery, which is typical of the expanded ex-mining villages, with just about a century of Labour working class and trade union movement tradition as captured in the Durham Gala, such as Ferryhill. Different flavours are added by the country town of Sedgefield itself, with its racecourse and Shrove Tuesday football match, and the largest centre of population, the New Town of Newton Aycliffe. Somehow County Durham seems the wrong sort of base for Tony Blair, with his classless goals and lack of roots in the Labour tradition; but he is surely grateful for a generous and tolerant constituency.

Personality Profile by Byron Criddle
Tony Blair, elected here in 1983, achieved in 1997 Labour's biggest ever landslide of 418 seats, by taking the Party into the Conservative southern heartlands. Born in 1953 into a Conservative-voting family and educated at Fettes and St John's College, Oxford - where he was apolitical - he rose in Labour politics in his 20s as an employment law barrister, and as a frontbencher coined an eye-catching sound-bite, "tough on crime, tough on the causes of crime", simultaneously reassuring to Guardian and to Mail readers. If Labour's 1997 victory was based largely on a rejection of the Conservatives and on perceptions of a Labour Party sanitised mostly under Smith and Kinnock, it also owed something to Blair's classless appeal to middle England in contrast to his predecessors' limited regional personas. With no 'big idea' emerging to clinch the second term denied Attlee and Wilson, reliance is placed on perceptions of Labour's economic competence, and of a Conservative Party still stuck with the image that sunk it in 1997, salted by a dose of focus-group-driven populism and a hope, no doubt, that the foot and mouth epidemic somehow reaches the hecklers from the WI.
ACORN Population Profile of the constituency
  Area
Percent
GB
Percent
Index
GB=100
 
Thriving
Wealthy Achievers, Suburban Areas 12.01% 14.99% 80.09
Affluent Greys, Rural Communities 0.31% 2.13% 14.52
Prosperous Pensioners, Retirement Areas 0.05% 2.49% 2.05
Expanding
Affluent Executives, Family Areas 4.93% 4.43% 111.45
Well-Off Workers, Family Areas 10.19% 7.27% 140.10
Rising
Affluent Urbanites, Town & City Areas 0.00% 2.56% 0.00
Prosperous Professionals, Metropolitan Areas 0.00% 2.04% 0.00
Better-Off Executives, Inner City Areas 0.33% 3.94% 8.37
Settling
Comfortable Middle Agers, Mature Home Owning Areas 6.04% 13.04% 46.29
Skilled Workers, Home Owning Areas 19.91% 12.70% 156.73
Aspiring
New Home Owners, Mature Communities 20.91% 8.14% 256.77
White Collar Workers, Better-Off Multi Ethnic Areas 0.00% 4.02% 0.00
Striving
Older People, Less Prosperous Areas 1.82% 3.19% 57.29
Council Estate Residents, Better-Off Homes 18.72% 11.31% 165.51
Council Estate Residents, High Unemployment 0.00% 3.06% 0.00
Council Estate Residents, Greatest Hardship 4.57% 2.52% 181.54
People in Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Areas 0.00% 2.10% 0.00
Unclassified
Unclassified 0.21% 0.06% 333.28
Household Income of the constituency
  Area
Percent
GB
Percent
Index
GB=100
 
0-5K 11.51% 9.41% 122.30
5-10K 19.82% 16.63% 119.16
10-15K 18.23% 16.58% 109.97
15-20K 13.79% 13.58% 101.49
20-25K 9.84% 10.39% 94.69
25-30K 6.95% 7.77% 89.40
30-35K 4.94% 5.79% 85.27
35-40K 3.55% 4.33% 81.98
40-45K 2.59% 3.27% 79.31
45-50K 1.91% 2.48% 77.09
50-55K 1.43% 1.90% 75.19
55-60K 1.08% 1.47% 73.54
60-65K 0.83% 1.15% 72.08
65-70K 0.64% 0.91% 70.77
70-75K 0.50% 0.72% 69.57
75-80K 0.39% 0.57% 68.47
80-85K 0.31% 0.46% 67.45
85-90K 0.25% 0.37% 66.48
90-95K 0.20% 0.31% 65.58
95-100K 0.16% 0.25% 64.72
100K + 0.80% 1.34% 59.87

Local Map of the constituency
Sedgefield - Local Map of the constituency

National Map of the constituency
Sedgefield - National Map of the constituency

Swing
1992-1997 1997-2001
Labour (8.96%)
Conservative (- 10.31%) Liberal Democrat (-  3.23%)
Conservative (3.07%) Liberal Democrat (2.53%)
Labour (-  6.30%)
Con - 10.31%
Lab 8.96%
LD - 3.23%
Con 3.07%
Lab - 6.30%
LD 2.53%
2001 Results - General Election (7 June 2001)
Tony Blair
Labour hold
Con Conservative (20.86%) 8,397 20.86%
Lab Labour (64.86%) 26,110 64.86%
LD Liberal Democrat (9.00%) 3,624 9.00%
Oth Other (5.28%) 2,127 5.28%
Maj Majority (44.00%) 17,713 44.00%
Turn Turnout (62.01%) 40,258 62.01%
2001 Results - General Election (7 June 2001)
Tony Blair
Labour hold
L Tony Blair 26,110 64.86%
C Douglas Carswell 8,397 20.86%
RRL Christopher Driver 375 0.93%
LD Andrew Duffield 3,624 9.00%
SL Brian Gibson 518 1.29%
WFLOE Helen John 260 0.65%
UK Andrew Spence 974 2.42%
Candidates representing 7 parties stood for election to this seat.
1997 Results - General Election (1 May 1997)
Tony Blair
Labour
Con Conservative (17.79%) 8,383 17.79%
Lab Labour (71.16%) 33,526 71.16%
LD Liberal Democrat (6.47%) 3,050 6.47%
Ref Referendum (3.57%) 1,683 3.57%
Oth Other (1.01%) 474 1.01%
Maj Majority (53.36%) 25,143 53.36%
Turn Turnout (72.57%) 47,116 72.57%
1992 Results -  General Election (9 April 1992)
Labour
Con Conservative (28.10%) 14,161 28.10%
Lab Labour (62.20%) 31,391 62.20%
LD Liberal Democrat (9.70%) 4,897 9.70%
Oth 0 0.00%
Maj Majority (34.20%) 17,230 34.20%
Turn Turnout (76.27%) 50,449 76.27%

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