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election2001
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Readers Poll Con 52% Lab 28% LD 18% Nat 2% Enter your vote to win 1M

Wolverhampton South East
Conservative gain

Constituency Profile by Robert Waller
South East is a different part of the new city of Wolverhampton (elevated in December 2000) from its other two constituencies. For a start, much of it has only been included within the Metropolitan Borough of Wolverhampton since it was expanded in the 1960s. This seat used to be called Bilston. Second, it has never even come close to being won by the Conservatives, unlike Enoch Powell's SW, and NE, which defected in the Thatcherite 1980s. Third, it is clearly among the three or four most working class seats in Britain, with less than 37pc in non-manual (what used to be called white-collar) jobs. It has more ethnic minority residents than NE, but also, and elsewhere, a very high proportion of council tenants. It has had only two MPs in the last fifty years, Dennis Turner and before him Bob Edwards, who made his name in left wing politics fighting in the Spanish Civil War. Things do not move very fast or far politically in this part of the world.

Personality Profile by Byron Criddle
Dennis Turner, Clare Short's PPS since 1997 and previously a Whip for four years (she was elected in 1987), is one of Labour's dwindling rump of proles: a burly Black Country man who as a beer-and-betting, chips-and-mushy-peas specialist is bothered about full pint measures disregarding the head, and as chairman of the Commons Catering Committee was credited with getting chips onto a Commons menu that had come (according to Joe Ashton) to resemble that of a Kensington wine bar. Born in 1942 and educated at Stonefield Secondary Modern, Bilston, and Bilston FE College, he was initially a steelworker, then transport manager, and finally chairman of a redundant steelworkers' co-operative involved in leisure provision. His Commons catering role led him to call for a "really lovely party" to celebrate the rescue of Rover in 2000.
ACORN Population Profile of the constituency
  Area
Percent
GB
Percent
Index
GB=100
 
Thriving
Wealthy Achievers, Suburban Areas 1.79% 14.99% 11.91
Affluent Greys, Rural Communities 0.00% 2.13% 0.00
Prosperous Pensioners, Retirement Areas 0.26% 2.49% 10.62
Expanding
Affluent Executives, Family Areas 0.95% 4.43% 21.36
Well-Off Workers, Family Areas 4.24% 7.27% 58.31
Rising
Affluent Urbanites, Town & City Areas 0.00% 2.56% 0.00
Prosperous Professionals, Metropolitan Areas 0.00% 2.04% 0.00
Better-Off Executives, Inner City Areas 0.00% 3.94% 0.00
Settling
Comfortable Middle Agers, Mature Home Owning Areas 1.53% 13.04% 11.71
Skilled Workers, Home Owning Areas 8.93% 12.70% 70.26
Aspiring
New Home Owners, Mature Communities 16.76% 8.14% 205.82
White Collar Workers, Better-Off Multi Ethnic Areas 3.85% 4.02% 95.84
Striving
Older People, Less Prosperous Areas 5.84% 3.19% 183.30
Council Estate Residents, Better-Off Homes 45.92% 11.31% 405.96
Council Estate Residents, High Unemployment 3.81% 3.06% 124.29
Council Estate Residents, Greatest Hardship 5.39% 2.52% 214.15
People in Multi-Ethnic, Low-Income Areas 0.74% 2.10% 35.28
Unclassified
Unclassified 0.00% 0.06% 0.00
Household Income of the constituency
  Area
Percent
GB
Percent
Index
GB=100
 
0-5K 16.44% 9.41% 174.62
5-10K 24.49% 16.63% 147.25
10-15K 19.91% 16.58% 120.09
15-20K 13.43% 13.58% 98.85
20-25K 8.61% 10.39% 82.88
25-30K 5.50% 7.77% 70.80
30-35K 3.56% 5.79% 61.50
35-40K 2.35% 4.33% 54.21
40-45K 1.58% 3.27% 48.38
45-50K 1.08% 2.48% 43.64
50-55K 0.76% 1.90% 39.72
55-60K 0.54% 1.47% 36.43
60-65K 0.39% 1.15% 33.64
65-70K 0.28% 0.91% 31.24
70-75K 0.21% 0.72% 29.17
75-80K 0.16% 0.57% 27.35
80-85K 0.12% 0.46% 25.74
85-90K 0.09% 0.37% 24.32
90-95K 0.07% 0.31% 23.05
95-100K 0.05% 0.25% 21.90
100K + 0.23% 1.34% 16.92

Local Map of the constituency
Wolverhampton South East - Local Map of the constituency

National Map of the constituency
Wolverhampton South East - National Map of the constituency

Swing
1992-1997 1997-2001
Labour (7.04%)
Conservative (- 11.54%) Liberal Democrat (-  0.05%)
Conservative (1.62%)
Labour (- 63.74%) Liberal Democrat (-  0.70%)
Con - 11.54%
Lab 7.04%
LD - 0.05%
Con 1.62%
Lab - 63.74%
LD - 0.70%
2001 Results - General Election (7 June 2001)
Dennis Turner
Conservative gain
Con Conservative (21.78%) 5,945 21.78%
Lab 0 0.00%
LD Liberal Democrat (8.75%) 2,389 8.75%
Oth Other (69.47%) 18,963 69.47%
Maj Majority (13.03%) 3,556 13.03%
Turn Turnout (50.61%) 27,297 50.61%
2001 Results - General Election (7 June 2001)
Dennis Turner
Conservative gain
NF James Barry 554 2.03%
C Adrian Pepper 5,945 21.78%
LC Dennis Turner 18,409 67.44%
LD Peter Wild 2,389 8.75%
Candidates representing 4 parties stood for election to this seat.
1997 Results - General Election (1 May 1997)
Dennis Turner
Labour
Con Conservative (20.16%) 7,020 20.16%
Lab Labour (63.74%) 22,202 63.74%
LD Liberal Democrat (9.45%) 3,292 9.45%
Ref Referendum (2.81%) 980 2.81%
Oth Other (3.84%) 1,336 3.84%
Maj Majority (43.59%) 15,182 43.59%
Turn Turnout (64.15%) 34,830 64.15%
1992 Results -  General Election (9 April 1992)
Labour
Con Conservative (31.70%) 12,975 31.70%
Lab Labour (56.70%) 23,215 56.70%
LD Liberal Democrat (9.50%) 3,881 9.50%
Oth Other (2.10%) 850 2.10%
Maj Majority (25.00%) 10,240 25.00%
Turn Turnout (71.70%) 40,921 71.70%

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